Signpost Eleven, ‘Froghopper’ by Jane Burn

froghopper

“…imagine what you are writing about. See it and live it. Do not think it up laboriously, as if you were working out mental arithmetic. Just look at it, touch it, smell it, listen to it, turn yourself into it. When you do this, the words look after themselves, like magic.”

(Ted Hughes, in Poetry in the Making: A Handbook for Writing and Teaching, 2008, Faber & Faber)

I love this quote from Ted Hughes because it makes poetry-writing seem the easiest thing in the world. There are so many Ted Hughes poems I could put on my blog, but I think everything that needs to be said about Ted Hughes and his poetry has probably already been said. I think it’s much better to introduce you to this gorgeous, vibrant poem from Jane Burn, which does just what Ted Hughes recommends. It is reproduced here by Jane’s kind permission and was first published in the literary magazine, Butcher’s Dog (http://www.butchersdogmagazine.com/)

frog poem.JPG

(Just a quick note here to say if you need an explanation of cuckoo spit, you can click https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?PID=490 )

Now to the poem!

Jane doesn’t so much describe the froghoppers, as become them, complete with their own voice; “Mummy born us”, they squeak, or maybe chirrup, “…we be bred in the purple, like majesties.”

Then look at the dense language and description. Jane Burn puts on such a satisfying show! Every one of the senses is stimulated in this gorgeous cabaret of words.

Another thing to take from Jane Burn’s poetry is the concept of the line: every line in this poem contains something captivating. Look how words are used to make this poem exciting. For example, “lick the stink” rather than, “we eat lavendar sap”; “lettuce-frail” rather than just “small”; “eyes, peepy-black”, rather than “small black”.

In fact, I’ve pretty much decided Jane Burn is a poetic reincarnation of Ted Hughes. (You read it first here!)

Jane has this way of filling her poems with image after sound after feeling until you are reeling. I would highly recommend her most recent collection, ‘Nothing more to it than bubbles’, published by Indigo Dreams. The details are on this link, which will also give you more information about Jane:

http://www.indigodreams.co.uk/jane-burn/4593090960

nothing

***

 So, for writing your own poems? Notice when you are struck by an interesting creature, object, concept and follow Ted Hughes’ advice. Collect your thoughts and ideas as they occur to you over a period of time, then start to form them in to a poem. Try and follow Jane Burns’ example and put on a cabaret!

Please do add a comment if this signpost has pointed you to a poem.

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